Peninsula Point

Year Established:
1865
Existing:
No
Download:
File Type:
jpg (image/jpeg)
Photo Date:
2013
Photo Credit:
Thomas Tag
Photo Courtesy of:
US Lighthouse Society Archives
Collection / Donor:

LOCATION

Location:
Peninsula Point/Lake Michigan
Latitude:
45° 40.05'
Longitude:
86° 58.02'
City / Town:
STONINGTON
U.S. State:
Michigan
Country:
United States

OWNER & ACCESS

Open to Public:
No
Light List Data:
  1. Peninsula Point
Light list data courtesy Gary Riemenschneider

STRUCTURE

Year Discontinued:
1936
Disposition:
Demolished by Usfs
Year Tower Established:
1865
Tower Construction Material:
BRICK
Tower Foundation:
NATURAL/EMPLACED
Height of light above mean high water, in feet:
41
Height, in feet, from base of structure to center of lantern:
36
Tower Shape:
SQUARE
Tower Daymark:
Yellow Brick
Fog Signal Building?:
No
Keeper's Quarters?:
No
Year Keeper's Quarters:
1865
Keeper's Quarters Construction:
BRICK

OPTICS

Active Aid to Navigation?:
No
Current Optic:
None
Original Optic Type:
4th Order
Year Original Lens Installed:
1865
Private Aid:
No
Year Automated:
1922
USCG Access to Optics:
No

Comments:

Historical Information:

  • 1856: Congress appropriated $5,000 for the station. However, due to problems with obtaining a title to the land, the money was recalled and it would take ten years before a station was finally built on the site.
  • 1865: A one and a half story dwelling was built from “cream city brick” with a 40 foot tower built into the southern gable. A fourth order Fresnel lens was installed.
  • 1922: The light was automated.
  • 1930: The shipping lane moved further south by the 1930’s.
  • 1934: A new light was built on the Minneapolis Shoal
  • 1936: The Peninsula Point Lighthouse was no longer needed and deactivated.
  • 1937: The US Forest Service took ownership of the light station.
  • The Stonington Grange restored the house and added picnic grounds. They won an award for the work they did.
  • 1959: Unfortunately, the keeper’s dwelling suffered a fire and was demolished.
  • 1962: The tower was repaired. It is no longer an active aid to navigation and is open to the public. The site is part of the Hiawatha National Forest and is an optimum site to witness the migration of the Monarch butterflies.

Entered by:
t.wheeler
Entered Date:
Jan 15, 2018